Crystalline Rainbow

Journey in Turkey (October 10 through October 25, 2017)

Day 5 and Day 6

800px-Mausoleo_Mevlana

Day 5 – From Cappadocia to Antalya Lara Hotel.

Saturday, October 14, 2017 (10:14:10) –A bus ride of 6 hours plus a visit to Mevlana Museum and in between coffee/tea/toilet break and lunch.

 

The spiral energy movement flow of this day and evening:

The Yellow Magnetic Seed initiates new creations in alignment with the Highest Good for All.

144-colour  The natural support of vision creating a Higher Consciousness within and your surroundings in its spiral energy movement that swirls into the Higher Good for All within Guidance of ripening a seed in fertile ground of germination as we all are being challenged, strengthened and create an opportunity or opening of receptivity what is there in the Presence of Now as it contains one of the keys to realisation. To awaken the awareness of navigating the evolution of synchronicity whilst being centered, grounded and anchored in the growth and development of action and potential development within.

 

During the bus ride through this magnificent beauty of Mother Nature, Wim, one of the group members, had a small music box with him whilst Carla sang along with the music it felt like a preparation for the visit to the museum.

 

Mevlana Museum

 

Here is a beautiful video created about the Museum https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jtr1A69PBr0

800px-Mausoleo_Mevlana

By Nazzarenoagostinelli – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=25019987

The Mevlâna Museum, located in Konya, Turkey, is the mausoleum of Jala ad Din Muhammad Rumi, a Persian Sufi mystic also known as Mevlâna or Rumi. It was also the dervish lodge (tekke) of the Mevlevi order, better known as the whirling dervishes.

Sultan “Ala” al-Din Kayqubad, the Seljuk sultan who had invited Mevlâna to Konya, offered his rose garden as a fitting place to bury Rumi’s father, Baha’ ud-Din Walad (also written as Bahaeddin Veled), when he died on 12 January 1231. When Mevlâna died on 17 December 1273 he was buried next to his father.

Groundplan.Mevlana

Mevlâna’s successor Hüsamettin Çelebi decided to build a mausoleum (Kubbe-i-Hadra) over his grave of his master. The Seljuk construction, under architect Behrettin Tebrizli, was finished in 1274. Gürcü Hatun, the wife of the Seljuk Emir Suleyman Pervane, and Emir Alameddin Kayser funded the construction. The cylindrical drum of the dome originally rested on four pillars. The conical dome is covered with turquoise faience.

However, several sections were added until 1854. Selimoğlu Abdülvahit decorated the interior and performed the woodcarving of the catafalques.

The decree of 6 April 1926 confirmed that the mausoleum and the dervish lodge (Dergah) were to be turned into a museum. The museum opened on 2 March 1927. In 1954 it was renamed as “Mevlâna Museum”.

mevlana-museum.fountain

One enters the museum through the main gate (Devisan Kapısı) to the marble-paved courtyard. The kitchen of the dervishes (Matbah) and the Hurrem Pasha tomb, built during the reign of Suleyman, the Magnificent, are located on the right side. On the left side are 17 dervish cells lined up, covered with small domes, and built during the reign of Murad III. The kitchen was also used for educating the dervishes, teaching them the Sema. The sardirvan (washing fountain) in the middle of the courtyard was built by Yavuz Sultan Selim.

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One enters the mausoleum and the small mosque through the Tomb gate (Türbe Kapisi). Its two doors are decorated with Seljuk motifs and a Persian text from mollah Abdurrahman Cami dating from 1492. It leads into the small Tilavet Room (Tilavet Odası) decorated with rare and precious Ottoman calligraphy in the sülüs, nesih, and talik styles. In this room, the Koran was continuously recited and chanted before the mausoleum was turned into a museum.

One enters the mausoleum from the Tilavet Room through a silver door made, according to an inscription on the door, by the son of Mehmed III in 1599. On the left side stand six coffins in rows of three of the dervishes (Horasan erler) who accompanied Mevlâna and his family from Belkh. Opposite to them on a raised platform, covered by two domes, stand the cenotaphs belonging to the descendants of the Mevlâna family (wife and children) and some high-ranking members of the Mevlevi order.

800px-Turkey_Konya008.inside de temple.Mevlana

The sarcophagus of Mevlâna is located under the green dome (Kibab’ulaktab). It is covered with brocade, embroidered in gold with verses from the Koran. This, and all other covers, were a gift of sultan Abdul Hamid II in 1894. The actual burial chamber is located below it. Next to Mevlâna’s sarcophagus are several others, including the sarcophagi of his father Bahaeddin Veled and his son Sultan Veled. The wooden sarcophagus of Mevlâna dates from the 12th century now stands over the grave of his father. It is a masterpiece of Seljuk woodcarving. The silver lattice, separating the sarcophagi from the main section, was built by Ilyas in 1579.

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The Ritual Hall (Semahane) was built under the reign of Süleyman the Magnificent at the same time as the adjoining small mosque. In this hall the dervishes used to perform the Sema, the ritual dance, on the rhythm of musical instruments such as, the kemence (a small violin with three strings), the keman (a larger violin), the halile (a small cymbal), the daire (a kind of tambourine), the kudüm (a drum), the rebab (a guitar) and the flute, played once by Mevlâna himself. All these instruments are on display in this room, together with an ancient Kirşehir praying rug (18th century), dervish clothes (Mevlâna’s included) and four crystal mosque lamps (16th century, Egyptian Mameluk period). In this room one can also see a rare Divan-i-Kebir (a collection of lyric poetry) from 1366 and two fine specimens of Masnavis (books of poems written by Mevlâna) from 1278 and 1371.

Source: wikipedia.com

Personal Note: We would recommend you read some of the poetry of Rumi. Here is an example:

A Star Without a Name

When a baby is taken from the wet nurse,

it easily forgets her

and starts eating solid food.

Seeds feed awhile on ground,

then lift up into the sun.

So, you should taste the filtered light

and work your way toward wisdom

with no personal covering.

 

That’s how you came here, like a star

without a name.

Move across the night sky

with those anonymous lights.

(Mathnawi III, 1284-1288)

“Say I am You” Coleman Barks Maypop, 1994

800px-Turkey_Konya019.holy scriptures

The adjoining small mosque (Masjid) is now used for the exhibition of a collection of old, illustrated Korans and extremely valuable prayer rugs. There is also a box (Sakal-i Ṣerif), decorated with nacre, containing the Holy Beard of Muhammad.

The mausoleum was depicted on the reverse of the Turkish 5000 lire banknotes of 1981-1994.

 currency

On was on my knees for awhile in the Mausoleum in silence attuning to this Light.

In the evening, there was a wedding in the Lara Hotel. It was certainly a pleasure to be part of this from a distance together with the Group of Travellers.

 

Day 6 – Antalya. Sunday, October 15, 2017 (10:15/6:10). A visit to the city of “Perge” and a jewelry retail building plus the center city of Antalya.

The spiral energy movement for this day and evening:

Red Lunar Serpent of being honest to recognising your limitations to embrace them and overcome them.

red_serpent_2_7_12  The natural supportive spiral movement energy flow of the inner realms to carry you within what you are now and where you are now is All what you ever wished to receive which brings the spiral movement of navigating the loving flow to let go of that which no longer serves and to trust the pathway you are in the Presence of Now whilst facing the challenge, strengthening and opportunity of tempering your service with nourishment and rest whilst believing who you are as a purpose of commitment we All have in the larger pattern. Than may we awaken in the conscious flow of inner guidance trusting the mystical intelligence as we all attune to the clear signals to be wholly centered, grounded and anchored in the quality of vitality, passion and sensing of the body wisdom to purify and integrate.

 

Perge (source Wikipedia.com)

 

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By Saffron Blaze – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=17596092

Perga or Perge (Greek: Πέργη Perge, Turkish: Perge) was an ancient Anatolian city in modern Turkey, once the capital of Pamphylia Secunda, now in Antalya province on the southwestern Mediterranean coast of Turkey. Today, it is a large site of ancient ruins 15 kilometres (9.3 mi) east of Antalya on the coastal plain. An acropolis located there dates back to the Bronze Age.

 perge-theatre-

History

Perga was an ancient and important city of Pamphylia, between the rivers Catarrhactes and Cestrus (Turkish Aksu Çayı).

A treaty between the Hittite Great King Tudhaliya IV and his vassal, the king of Tarhuntassa, defined the latter’s western border at the city “Parha” and the “Kastaraya River”. The river is assumed to be the classical Cestrus. West of Parha were the “Lukka Lands”. Parha likely spoke a late Luwian dialect like Lycian and that of the neo-Hittite kingdoms.

perge-fußboden

Perge returns to history as a Pamphylian Greek city, and with Pamphylia came under successive rule by Persians, Athenians, and Persians again. Alexander the Great, after quitting Phaselis, occupied Perge with a part of his army. The road between these two towns is described as long and difficult. Alexander’s rule was followed by the Diadochi empire of the Seleucids, then the Romans.

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Perge gained renown for the worship of Artemis, whose temple stood on a hill outside the town, and in whose honour annual festivals were celebrated. The coins of Perge represent both the goddess and her temple.

In 46 A.D., according to the Acts of the Apostles, St. Paul journeyed to Perga, from there continued on to Antiocheia in Pisidia, then returned to Perga where he preached the word of God (Acts 14:25). Then he left the city and went to Attaleia.

perge1

As the Cestrus silted up over the late Roman era, Perga declined as a secular city.[8] In the first half of the 4th century, during the reign of Constantine the Great (324-337), Perga became an important centre of Christianity, which soon became the official religion of the Roman Empire. The city retained its status as a Christian centre in the 5th and 6th centuries.

Ecclesiastical history

St. Paul the Apostle and his, companion St. Barnabas, twice visited Perga as recorded in the biblical book, the Acts of the Apostles, during their first missionary journey, where they “preached the word” before heading for and sailing from Attalia (modern-day Antalya city), 15 kilometres (9.3 mi) to the southwest, to Antioch.

perge-antalya-turkey-view-of-egg-and-dart-moulding-and-relief-carving-CFK4XT

Paul and Barnabas came to Perge during their first missionary journey, but probably stayed there only a short time, and do not seem to have preached there; it was there that John Mark left Paul to return to Jerusalem. On his return from Pisidia, Paul preached at Perge.

St. Matrona of Perge of the 6th century was a female saint known for temporarily cross-dressing to avoid her abusive husband. She also is known for opposing the Monophysite policy of the emperor Anastasios I. Matrona hid in the monastery of St. Bassion as the enuch Babylos. Once revealed, she was sent to a woman’s monastery where she was head of the convent. She was famous for her miraculous gift of healing. She went on to found a nunnery in Constantinople. St Matrona died at the age of 100. Her life was told through a vita prima whose author and exact time period remains a mystery.

Perge-Aksu-Antalya-Turkey-12

The Greek Notitiae episcopatuum mentions the city as metropolis of Pamphylia Secunda until the 13th century. Le Quien gives the names of 11 of its bishops: Epidaurus, present at the Council of Ancyra in 312; Callicles at the First Council of Nicaea in 325; Berenianus, at Constantinople (426); Epiphanius at the Second Council of Ephesus (449), at the First Council of Chalcedon (451), and a signatory of the letter from the bishops of the province to Emperor Leo (458); Hilarianus, at a council at Constantinople in 536; Eulogius, at the Second Council of Constantinople in 553; Apergius, condemned as a Monothelite at the Third Council of Constantinople in 680; John, at the Trullan council in 692; Sisinnius Pastillas about 754 (an iconoclast who was condemned at the Second Council of Nicaea in 787); Constans, at the same council of that condemned his predecessor; John, at the Council of Constantinople of 869–70.

No longer a residential, the bishopric is included in the Catholic Church‘s list of titular sees.

Perga remained inhabited until the Seljuks.

Remains

Perga is today an archaeological site and a tourist attraction. Ancient Perge, one of the chief cities of Pamphylia, was situated between the Rivers Catarrhactes (Düden Nehri) and Cestrus (Aksu), 60 stadia (about 11.1 kilometres (6.9 mi)) from the mouth of the latter; the site is in the modern Turkish village of Murtana on the Suridjik sou, a tributary of the Cestrus, formerly in the Ottoman vilayet of Konya. Its ruins include a theatre, a palaestra, a temple of Artemis and two churches. The temple of Artemis was located outside the town.

Here a you tube impression of Perge.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t6DF7BB91MA

We had lunch somewhere.

 

We than visited a jewelry retail building. Amazing artistic jewelry was displayed here. Also, we went into the center of Antalya for some to do shopping for others just for a walk.

 

In the evening once more a wedding party was at Lara Hotel. This time it was a different tradition and the music was also adjusted to the party there.

 

Gratitude

 

 

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